Mint.com Review

I was lucky to get to be a beta-tester of the new online finance application mint.com. I wouldn’t usually write reviews like this, but I even shared this site with some of my family members because I thought it was so cool.

This is what I’ve been waiting for in a finance application

This has been the application I’ve been waiting for. The interface is slick, and the auto-updates of your accounts seamless. I easily added my wells fargo checking accounts as well as a few of my personal credit card accounts. Once I get my financial situation a bit more stable (if that ever happens), I will definitely be using mint to manage, monitor, and analyze my spending.

Main Interface

mintThe main overview of your accounts gives a great snapshot of your latest transactions, alerts and more. Obviously my financial health is bad (and I haven’t even imported all my accounts. Mint.com can’t handle collection accounts)

Analyze Spending…easily

Mint.com makes analyzing and tagging transactions really, really easy. Sadly, it recognizes (truthfully…grrr) that my “most frequented merchant” is “overdraft fee”. Darn!

Favorite Feature

Probably my favorite feature is the ability to receive text messages when an account reaches a certain threshold. For example, lets say you want to receive a text when your checking account falls below $100.

Bugs and gripes

The one feature of mint that seemed to annoy me (that I probably just need to tweak a bit in my settings) was the e-mails I would receive of “large deposits” in my bank account. That’s great and all, but I got an e-mail this morning of a large deposit, that was dated August 28th. Not exactly current.

More Screenshots

Main Tabs

mint I need to update some of my “tags”

I don’t know about you, but I love Mint.com for keeping track of the household budget. I love that I can check it with a mobile device or online.  With my husband and I working separate shifts, we don’t always communicate about money and budgets very well, so this way we both check in regularly to see how we’re doing.

I love seeing the daily and weekly cashflow alerts and budgets. I also love the mobile alerts when a balance is unexpectedly low. (For instance: this week a client’s check in one of my deposits bounced! I wouldn’t have known for three days without Mint alerting me.)

Mint has added some new features that users should be aware of. (And if you haven’t tried it yet, perhaps these features are just what you need!)

Cash tracking

Typically, I withdraw $270 per week. That buys groceries, gas money for my husband and I and a little bit of pocket money for each of us. Everything else is a check or online payment. Sometimes it is hard to keep tabs on where that $270 in cash all went if the envelope ledgers were not kept up properly (we use the envelope system here).  Even then, I had to go through and tell Mint how to divide up the cash.

Now, Mint can handle the cash, and all cash transactions land in the proper budget category. If you’re a mobile user, you can even select your purchase location from GPS. (See examples).

Just log in, enter the amount of cash spent along with the location and it records.

Credit: Mint.com

Checks

You can record a check you’ve written, and even before it’s cashed, it will record in Mint.  No more wondering what’s out there waiting to clear. (This is going to make balancing my checkbook go so much faster!)

Image credit: Mint.com

 

Pending

Did you charge or promise funds that haven’t been accounted for yet? Just log them here.

Image credit: Mint.com

Mint.com Bill Paying Issues

Nov 23, 2010

Mint.com Late PaymentsBefore Mint.com was acquired by Intuit, they had a history of slow payments to contract bloggers for content and advertising.

Since the acquisition, thousands of dollars has gone unpaid to at least a half dozen personal finance bloggers, including $1200 to one blogger alone.

“The process was running really smooth until Intuit took over. As of now, November will be 9 months of them not paying me. They keep saying they are going to pay, but I’m kind of getting fed up with it which sucks, because I really like Mint”
- Personal Finance Blogger

Another blogger on neglect at Mint.com,

“Working with them up until the last few months for me hasn’t been that bad. They were always slow in paying, but they always paid.

In the last few months, however, their slowness has turned into outright neglect -and multiple emails garnered no response. Finally they have gotten back to me and I expect to be paid within the next couple of weeks, but it has been a long time coming.

I really noticed things getting slower in the last 6 months or so especially since they were bought out by Intuit, and things at their company started changing, and i think a lot of bloggers were just falling through the cracks. They told me that systems were changing, and that they were trying to come up with a new to make the payments happen, but it probably slower than it needed to be.

If they can get things squared away and a new process working, i’ll be happy to continue with them, but the last few months have left a sour taste in my mouth” – Blogger currently owed $1200

From Mrs. Micah @ Finance Freelance Life,

“FWIW, 2 days ago I closed my Mint.com account and in reasons for closing said 1) I wasn’t using it any more but that I’d probably have let it stay dormant except 2) I heard that they had owed thousands of dollars to bloggers who’d advertised for it and hadn’t paid them in over 6 months. And that I thought it was a shoddy way to run a business.

I’m actually pretty sure that they owe me money from last winter, but it was so long ago and I don’t even know if I have the e-mails and it’s too much of a headache to dig those out. So I just said bloggers.

Dunno if that was in any way helpful, but I figured I’d vote with my membership.”

I’ve been sitting on this post for nearly a month now, debating on what to do. But after following up with multiple bloggers who have still not been paid…it was time.

I guarantee I’ll be getting an e-mail from someone at Intuit within a few hours of this post asking how they can fix this.

But it shouldn’t take a public flogging for a company pushing financial fitness to pay it’s bills.

Disclosure: I use Mint.com often. I was an early beta-tester of the site, and to this day I probably login a half dozen times a month. I’ve never taken payment or done any paid advertising for them.

Update: I have reached out to a contact at Mint.com for a comment. I will post it here when I receive a reply.

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  • http://www.mattder.com Matt

    I am also a beta-tester and had to promise not to take screenshots of of the website before mint.com goes public. You may want to check into that.

  • Andrew

    It launched officially today!

  • http://www.mydebtblog.com Jim

    Yes this launched and I have been curious about it. The banks are starting to put these applications out there to actually help people track their money and see what they’re doing. Thanks for posting the screens of how your stuff is broken down that puts some insight on it.

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  • Vilmar

    Look interesting, thanks for posting about it

  • steve

    I just tried to add about 20 accounts and not one was accepted?? All major banks??

    It looks great, but does it really work?

  • http://electriccheckbook.com Robert Bousquet

    Have you seen our Electric CheckBook entry for RailsRumble07? It was completely designed and built by our 3-man team during the 48-hour Rails competition.

    ElectricCheckBook – http://electriccheckbook.com
    RailsRumble07 – http://vote.railsrumble.com

    Its flexible double-entry ledgers can be shared within a group enabling remote partners, your accountant and spouse to share access to the appropriate accounts without emailing files back and forth.

    Mint is obviously a bit more mature, but ours was designed, developed and launched in 48 hours. It has already replaced Quickbooks for our small distributed team and handles our accounting, project budgeting, and contractor timesheets. We’ll continue to add features that we need to manage our personal and business finances.

  • http://debtsucks.wordpress.com Jake Stichler

    Mint can’t handle collection accounts? There are a LOT of things Mint can’t handle…. >:-|

  • Kaleo

    I have been using Mint for a few months now and am generally happy with it. Some issues:

    As noted above, delay in emailing alerts.

    Sometimes, I get duplicate emails. Either one will be fairly timely and the other one a week or more later or both will appear within a day or two of each other. Very confusing!

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  • Jessie West

    No one else is bothered by not being able to create your own categories in MINT? It’s useless to me if I can’t do that. And why can’t I? How hard could that be for the developers? I just checked again last week with MINT customer service and they confirmed you can’t. Also, you can’t delete transactions. Bum stone drag! And, what do you MINT fans do if, say, you charge $50 gas to your card and your friend pays you $25 cash for her share for a trip you take together? MINT is too dummed down for the sake of “ease” of use.

  • http://debtsucksblog.com Jake Stichler

    Jesse, that’s exactly why I wrote my big long rant about them on opening day. Not much has changed.

  • jpierre

    Heard this scary news: http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/05/19/financial-exposure-rudder-inadvertently-
    shows-users-each-others-bank-account-info/

    I just deleted my a/c at mint.com. My financial data is too sensitive to be thrown all over the web (rudder.com, mint.com etc…)

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